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Page Title: P4S: Primary Schools : Multicultural Community
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Multicultural Community

A Multicultural Community - Don't judge a book by its cover !

This upper key stage 2 unit of work allows schools to look introspectively at their own community and recognise their strengths and weaknesses in promoting equality in school. Pupils investigate multiculturalism in their own and the wider community and reasons why people may become terrorists or support violent extremism. They then audit their own school/setting through developing questionnaires, recording data, suggesting improvements and present findings. Finally, pupils evaluate the effectiveness of the audit and its future impact.

 

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This upper key stage 2 unit of work allows schools to look introspectively at their own community and recognise their strengths and weaknesses in promoting equality in school. Pupils investigate multiculturalism in their own and the wider community and reasons why people may become terrorists or support violent extremism. They then audit their own school/setting through developing questionnaires, recording data, suggesting improvements and present findings. Finally, pupils evaluate the effectiveness of the audit and its future impact.

Download the resource - A Multicultural Community' - Don't judge a book by its cover!
 

             

 

Year 5/6 Audit
 
This upper key stage 2 unit of work allows schools to look introspectively at their own community and recognise their strengths and weaknesses in promoting equality in school. Pupils investigate multiculturalism in their own and the wider community and reasons why people may become terrorists or support violent extremism. They then audit their own school/setting through developing questionnaires, recording data, suggesting improvements and present findings. Finally, pupils evaluate the effectiveness of the audit and its future impact.

End Purpose
: to stop people becoming terrorists or supporting violent extremism.
 
Staff may wish to begin by auditing the school themselves to recognise the school’s strengths and weaknesses in promoting equality in school. The race equality audit is a useful document for this. Staff may also need to agree on a set of words which should be used when discussing ethnic diversity and racism.
 
Who are we? Pupils begin by considering themselves and their place in the world. 
- Name game. Pupils sit in a circle and the first child says their name, the second child repeats the name and says theirs. This continues around the circle so that the last child says everyone’s name plus their own. Then repeat the game but all pupils face outwards so memory is vital. At the end of the game ask pupils how they remembered the order. What did they remember when they thought of each child to remember their names?
- What’s in a name? (SCARF resource P 11). Questions could include: Who gave you your name? Do you think your name suits you?What do you like/dislike about it? Have you ever chosen to be called something else (shortened, nickname etc)? Do other people call you anything different? Do you like this?
- 3 Words activity (SCARF resource P15) Describe yourself in 3 words using the prompt sheet. Share this with a partner, your partner then introduces you to the class. All pupils are special and different.
- Writing activity – Who am I? Include: How do I see myself? How to others see me? How do I see others? What makes me unique?
 
Groups in school? What groups do I belong to? How do I feel about different groups in school? Do I ever feel excluded? Why is this and how does it make me feel? 
 
Moving into a wider society: What is a multicultural society? What does it need? What harms it? What do pupils currently know about people from other races? – ask them to generate a mind-map recording current knowledge, which can be used at the end of your work to determine changes in understanding.
 
Do we live in a multicultural society? Think about school and community level as well as the national picture. What challenges does it face? Think about your favourite TV programmes and films – do they represent all members of the community? Make a diary of your weekly viewing with this in mind. 
 
Maps: This maps shows the ethnic make up of Britain and is interactive. It can easily be seen where ethnic groups are distributed and clustered. Pupils could investigate their area of the country and consider why certain groups clustered where they did (EG ports, mills). http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/interactive/2011/may...
 
Identify and define racism, terrorism, prejudice, extremism as required. Give examples. Agree set of acceptable vocabulary and the need for sensitivity. Pupils may wish to investigate racism and the law and processes for dealing with racist incidents in school.
 
Local newspaper investigation – local views and feelings about people from different communities. How are different groups represented? How much news is positive? Are all sectors of the community represented in the media?
 
Local shops – do they represent our diversity? What do they sell? Do we have any local community links?
 
People who have encountered these issues – class clips resources has good examples form children themselves, Jesse Owens (You Tube clips of races), Martin Luther King, Saints and Martyrs. Pupils could write poems based on Martin Luther King’s ‘I Have A Dream’ speech. The film ‘Hairspray’ raises questions about racial segregation in America in the 1960s. Pupils may wish to investigate this aspect of prejudice.
 
School – are we a multicultural community? How do we know? What is our ethnic mix across the school? Family heritages? Have a family tree day where pupils bring in information to create a tree. What religious groups do people belong to? How can we celebrate the different heritages? Invite guests? Have a picnic? Agree what we will do and why during project (success criteria) e.g. to audit and improve by...
 
Carry out an audit of our school – how do we currently promote tolerance, understanding, diversity in our setting?
 
Questionnaire development – Pupils can develop their own questionnaire to find out what different school stakeholders feel about multiculturalism in their setting? Questions could include: Where do your family come from? How do you think we promote different cultures in our school? Do we have enough resources showing different heritage groups? Do you know any stories from different cultures? Data can then be recorded in tables, graphs and charts to allow pupils to present their findings and link to numeracy and ICT skills.
 
What could we improve? Information from the questionnaire could be used to inform this, along with a learning walk through school where pupils spot evidence of multicultural resources, pictures and artefacts. Pupils could also look at school resources such as library or reading scheme books. What prior learning can they remember where race, diversity and tolerance were discussed. What is the school mission statement and motto? Does this reflect your schools attitude to diversity?
 
How can we achieve the improvements? What will it cost? How long will it take? Create an action plan.
 
Pupils could present their findings and action plan to the SMT and agree a way forward.
 
The class could develop an assembly to share their project with all.
 
Groups of pupils can construct photostories/ powerpoint presentations about how the school promotes diversity.(see example)
 
Evaluate the success of the project against criteria set).Ask pupils what has been learned? Do we respect and reflect all heritages and religious groups in our school and community? Ask pupils to construct a mind-map showing their new knowledge and compare with beginning of theme.
 
Possibly revisit later – are we still doing all we agreed, have we continued to improve understanding?
 
Possible resources: 
BBC Class Clips PSHE – Racism
      Differences and similarities
 
Other ideas:
Same but different – investigate other faiths and cultures. Visit other faith groups and cultures. Have a world food day to sample different foods linked with specific groups.
Don’t judge a book by its cover – Why do people hold extreme views? Investigate examples from history. Hitler and Nazis, Communism, BNP, How do these views link to violence?
Can violence solve problems? – from smacking to fighting in school to terrorism. Pupils could present arguments for and against and produce persuasive writing to explain points of view.
Grievances and conflict resolution – how do we solve our problems?
Act your age – taking responsibilities for your actions throughout life. All actions have consequences – this can be demonstrated through the story of ‘Charlie and the Chocolate factory’.
Debates – Them and Us, Good and Bad, right and wrong.
 
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